Christian History Project. This site contains the text of 12 volumes on the history of mankind over the last 2,000 years written from a 'collectively-denominational' Christian perspective.

2. Resurrection of Jesus |
Madman or God?

Resurrection of Jesus is a continuation from the first segment (About Jesus Christ). The Resurrection of Jesus segment is from the chapter about Jesus Christ as seen in Volume One, The Veil is Torn. The Resurrection of Jesus segment describes the problems presented to the Saducean government by the disappearance of the body of Jesus of Nazareth and what to do with about the claims being spread by His followers about the resurrection of Jesus.

With no body, authorities are left with a cold case yet to be solved after 2,000 years

About Jesus / Resurrection of Jesus

About Jesus / Resurrection of Jesus
The Resurrection of Jesus segment describes the problems presented to the Saducean government by the disappearance of the body of Jesus of Nazareth and what to do with about the claims being spread by His followers about the resurrection of Jesus.

So he was stopped, convicted of blasphemy in a Jewish trial and at the request of the Jewish leaders crucified by the Romans–God knows, the most ghastly death human ingenuity had ever contrived. Cruel, yes. But what was the alternative? Another religious movement, another insurrection, more hundreds slaughtered by the dreaded Twelfth Legion, the “Syrian Legion,” as they called it, two of whose cohorts were stationed in Jerusalem. Both were under the orders of the Jew-hating Roman governor, Pilate. So as Caiaphas, the high priest, said at the time: “Better one man should suffer than the whole people.” Harsh, certainly. But could you argue with his reasoning?

So the body was entombed, a huge boulder rolled against the entrance, and a guard posted by the Temple police. Toward dawn the next morning, something happened. That seems conclusive enough. But what? The guard fled, the stone was moved, and the body disappeared. How this occurred, the authorities simply did not adequately explain. Clearly, they said, his followers must have bribed the guard, somehow rolled away the great stone and stolen the corpse. The obvious solution–to produce the man’s body and have done with this nonsense–failed. The fact is, search though they certainly did, they couldn’t find it.

So what could they do? Some no doubt suggested the Temple officials find another body, any body, and claim it was his. But then would they crucify it first? Where, how, and under what circumstances would you do the crucifying? And suppose the ruse were discovered! Better to just stay with the truth, some said. But then, what was the truth? No one knew–unless of course you were prepared to accept the preposterous fantasies of Jesus’ followers. Such, for officialdom, was the imponderable problem the case posed.

But was this not in character? As they saw it, imponderables such as this had attended everything about the man since his initial appearance in Galilee some three years before.

His origins, like the origins of everything else in Galilee, were obscure. His widowed mother, now resident in Jerusalem with one of his faithful, told stories of curious manifestations in the heavens at the time of his birth, of angels appearing, of astrologers from the East, probably Zoroastrians, bringing gifts to the child. All patently ludicrous to those who had done away with him.

In any event, it had been disclosed during his trial that this man Jesus was not, in fact, Galilean-born. His mother, a direct descendant of King David, incidentally, and her husband had traveled south to Judea, specifically to the town of Bethlehem, six miles south of Jerusalem, to conform to one of the census schemes devised by Quirinius, governor of Syria at the time, who had jurisdiction over Judea.1 You can’t properly govern without assessing taxes, the Romans knew. To create a reliable tax roll, everyone had to be named, recorded and counted. And the most efficient means of assuring accuracy, the Romans decided, was to require everyone to go back to the town of his birth.

This is the end of the second segment, Resurrection of Jesus, of Chapter 1 from The Veil is Torn. Click here to continue reading beyond this Resurrection of Jesus segment to the next segment on the Son of David.


To learn more on the resurrection of Jesus and His impact on world events ever since please support this project by buying The Veil is Torn, from TheChristians.info.