Christian History Project. This site contains the text of 12 volumes on the history of mankind over the last 2,000 years written from a 'collectively-denominational' Christian perspective.

1. Pentecost and Jesus Christ |
Madman or God?

About Jesus Christ is the beginning of Chapter One from Volume One, The Veil is Torn, of the twelve-volume historical series: The Christians, Their First Two Thousand Years. This section of the chapter is about Jesus death and why the Sanhedrin, after convening a trial about Jesus, ultimately condemn Jesus to be crucified. The Pentecost is often used to refer to the jubilant revelation about Jesus resurrection by His followers.

 

‘Who are you?’ the high priest demanded, and Jesus’ answer led him to the cross

About Jesus Christ - Madman or God?

About Jesus Christ – Madman or God?
This section of the chapter is about Jesus death and why the Sanhedrin, after convening a trial about Jesus, ultimately condemn Jesus to be crucified. The Pentecost is often used to refer to the jubilant revelation about Jesus resurrection by His followers.

To any respectable and devout Jew, that mid-morning exhibition in the late spring of the year 3791 on the Jewish calendar–a date believed by the devout to be three thousand, seven hundred and ninety-one years after the creation of the world–would have been at once predictable, astonishing and outrageous. Predictable because it seemed likely these people were planning some new show to capture attention, astonishing because they rather specialized in the bizarre, and outrageous because everything they did was outrageous.

So now, there they were, these men, three dozen or more, mostly in their twenties, streaming from that house into the street, babbling like lunatics, and yelling out something about “the Coming of the Holy Spirit.” They were drunk, obviously. A drunken debauch, and it was not even yet noon. Was this any way to celebrate Pentecost, the Jewish feast that welcomed the first harvest?

For the participants in that unusual event, all of whom were Jews, and for those who followed them for the next twenty centuries, it would mark the birth of the Christian church, the institutional embodiment of the world’s numerically greatest religion. But for those sincere and God-fearing Jews who looked on from without at the time, it would have occasioned only dismay and disgust. They would no doubt be asking: What will it be next?

What indeed! What had it been already? The leader of these people, the man Jesus, of Nazareth, the one the authorities called “The Blasphemer,” had been dead for six Sabbaths. Crucified, a hideous fate, after he was found guilty of blasphemy, of calling himself by the unmentionable Name of God. Such a death was unfortunate, but necessary and deserved. Moreover, or so the authorities fondly thought, it would put an end to what was plainly a one-man movement.

Unhappily, they were wrong. His followers, now dancing around the street and babbling about “the Holy Spirit,” somehow became persuaded he had returned from the dead. “Risen” was the word they used. Indeed, they insisted upon it, telling others they had repeatedly seen and talked to him and convincing them to join their celebration. So rather than quietly fade as had been hoped, the movement was now more alive than ever, and what had previously been an irritant was now becoming a first-class problem.

A problem for several reasons. The Romans under whose imperial yoke Jewry had been suffering these past seventy years viewed all novel Jewish religious movements as implicitly seditious, and they put them down with a ferocity that could see thousands perish horribly, including the innocent. Worse still, the man Jesus and his movement came from Galilee, a hotbed of anti-Roman insurrection and intrigue, a province whose southern limits lay about sixty-five miles north of Jerusalem. Then too, the Blasphemer himself had repeatedly compromised the Law. And as every good Jew knew, the whole mission of the Jewish people, their very unity and integrity, consisted of and depended on the preservation of the Law. To compromise the Law was to challenge in particular the Pharisees, the party which saw the observance of the Law as the central responsibility of the Jewish people. Finally, the man was plainly anti-Temple as well. He said the imperishable building itself, indeed the whole ecclesiastical structure that supported it and fulfilled the ritual animal sacrifice it had been consecrated to perform, was doomed. That made him equally offensive to the high priests whose job was operating and preserving the Temple, and their party, the Sadducees.

This is the end of the first segment, about Jesus Christ, of Chapter 1 from The Veil is Torn. To continue reading more about Jesus from The Christians, Their First Two Thousand Years, Volume One — The Veil is Torn then proceed to the next section on the Resurrection of Jesus.

To learn more about Jesus and His impact on world events ever since please support this project by buying The Veil is Torn, from Books.TheChristians.com.