Christian History Project. This site contains the text of 12 volumes on the history of mankind over the last 2,000 years written from a 'collectively-denominational' Christian perspective.

Roman Engineering |
The Christians lived amidst the grandeur that Rome conferred on the world

Roman Engineering is drawn from Chapter Two, beginning on page 42, of Volume Two, A Pinch of Incense of the twelve-volume historical series The Christians: Their First Two Thousand Years. If you would like to order this book please visit www.TheChristians.info.

Asia Minor’s luxury inspired the conquerors to expand upon the opulence they found there

Roman Engineering - The Christians lived amidst the grandeur that Rome conferred on the world

Roman Engineering – The Christians lived amidst the grandeur that Rome conferred on the world
Even the most remote of Rome’s provincial cities in Asia Minor boasted some feature reflecting the wealth and culture of the empire. The magnificent theater of Aspendos overlooks the Mediterranean coastal plain about two hundred and thirty air miles southeast of Ephesus, near the modern Turkish center of Antalya.

Imperial Rome was nothing if not an occupier, but it was neither barbaric nor impoverished, and when it enveloped a country or a city it stamped everything it found there with its unmistakable imprint, often making significant improvements. In Asia Minor, in particular, Roman architects and craftsmen added opulent embellishments to the luxurious appointments that existed there long before they arrived. As a result, although distant from the center of the empire, those who lived in the Roman-occupied cities of Asia Minor were much more than remote agricultural workers, scraping by uncultured in rude tents and huts. Instead, their well-established cities drew the admiration and appreciation of their conquerors, who remodeled and expanded buildings, gardens and other facilities in much more than just a utilitarian manner. Thus the subject territories continued to provide artistic, cultural and educational opportunities unrivaled in most of the non-Roman world. Remains of what Rome created in the region show the breadth and ambition of its influence.

This is the end of the Roman Engineering category article drawn from Chapter Two, beginning on page 42, of Volume Two, A Pinch of Incense. To continue reading more about Roman Engineering from The Christians, Their First Two Thousand Years we suggest experiencing the rest of the book, complete with hundreds of magnificent illustrations, by ordering it at www.TheChristians.info