Christian History Project. This site contains the text of 12 volumes on the history of mankind over the last 2,000 years written from a 'collectively-denominational' Christian perspective.

Sunni Shia Relations |
After fourteen centuries emotions still smolder

Sunni Shia Relations is drawn from Chapter Seven, beginning on page 194, of Volume Five, The Sword of Islam of the twelve-volume historical series The Christians: Their First Two Thousand Years. If you would like to order this book please visit www.TheChristians.info.

Sunni Shia Relations - After fourteen centuries emotions still smolder

Sunni Shia Relations – After fourteen centuries emotions still smolder
A popular uprising by Iraqi Shi‘ites at the end of the 1991 Gulf War was suppressed with brutal force, leaving cities such as Karbala (above) in ruins

The impact of Islam’s seventh-century schism still reverberates throughout the Muslim world. After the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003, members of Iraq’s Shia community stand in front of a huge mural commemorating two assassinated clerics. A popular uprising by Iraqi Shi‘ites at the end of the 1991 Gulf War was suppressed with brutal force, leaving cities such as Karbala (see photo) in ruins. After the arrival of American forces in 2003, Shi‘ites searched for relatives missing since the uprising. Outside the town of Hilla, some three thousand bodies were discovered in a mass grave, but for the first time in a quarter-century, Iraqi Shi‘ites were also free to visit shrines in Najaf and Karbala–and to commemorate the death of Imam Hussein with traditional displays of grief and self-flagellation in a celebration known as Ashoura. In this photograph (see book), men carrying a blood-soaked banner make their way to Karbala through a sandstorm. In many parts of the Islamic world, the bloodier aspects of Ashoura are restricted, but in the Persian Gulf state of Bahrain, thousands of men still flock to local mosques to receive a ritual head wound, symbolic of Hussein’s death. Islam’s Sunni majority officially regards such behavior with reservation, but Sunni, too, has its extremists–such as these members of the militant group Sipah-e-Sahaba, demonstrating in Karachi, Pakistan, in support of the September 11, 2001, attacks against the United States.

This is the end of the Sunni Shia Relations category article drawn from Chapter Seven, beginning on page 194, of Volume Five, The Sword of Islam. To continue reading more about Sunni Shia Relations from The Christians, Their First Two Thousand Years we suggest experiencing the rest of the book, complete with hundreds of magnificent illustrations, by ordering it at www.TheChristians.info