Christian History Project. This site contains the text of 12 volumes on the history of mankind over the last 2,000 years written from a 'collectively-denominational' Christian perspective.

Notre Dame Cathedral |
A paradox of history

Notre Dame Cathedral is drawn from Chapter Two, beginning on page 52, of Volume Seven, A Glorious Disaster of the twelve-volume historical series The Christians: Their First Two Thousand Years. If you would like to order this book please visit www.TheChristians.info.

That the same bellicose Christians who launched the Crusades should produce the greatest flowering of Christian creativity yet seen poses an unexplained mystery

Notre Dame Cathedral - A paradox of history

Notre Dame Cathedral – A paradox of history
‘Our Lady of Paris’ — The great cathedral of Notre Dame (Our Lady) presides over the heart of Paris from its site on the Ile de la Cité (Island of the City). The Seine is in the foreground, the city’s “Latin Quarter” in the background at the left. The photo is of Notre Dame’s east face, not as familiar as that of the west but well depicting the dominant role the building has played in the history of France for more than seven hundred years.

To Heinrich Heine, the nineteenth- century German romantic poet, the Gothic cathedrals were built by men filled with conviction. “We moderns,” he writes in a letter to his friend August Lewald, “have opinions, but it requires something more than an opinion to build a Gothic cathedral.” In 1160 Maurice de Sully, certainly a man of conviction and bishop of Paris, decreed that the old Romanesque church that had existed upon this site since the sixth century was not befitting of Paris’s new role as “the parish church of the kings of Europe.” Therefore he ordered the old church demolished along with the houses around it to make room for the first western cathedral built on such a monumental scale. Legend portrays him sketching the original plan in the dirt outside of the old church. De Sully was also the cathedral’s original benefactor, directing most of his modest fortune towards its construction. But he never saw the completed cathedral. He died in 1196, more than half a century before the work was done. Similarly deep convictions launched the Crusades; in fact the Third Crusade set forth from the very steps of Notre Dame of Paris.

This is the end of the Notre Dame Cathedral category article drawn from Chapter Two, beginning on page 52, of Volume Seven, A Glorious Disaster. To continue reading more about Notre Dame Cathedral from The Christians, Their First Two Thousand Years we suggest experiencing the rest of the book, complete with hundreds of magnificent illustrations, by ordering it at www.TheChristians.info